A Jewish Puerto Rican Thanksgiving


Want to make the ultimate Thanksgiving turkey? That’s bursting with flavor and juicy as all get out? Follow our instructions below.

Thanksgiving 2008 by you.

This is by far the most colorful Thanksgiving plate I’ve ever seen.

So after visiting Guavate, Rachel and I knew that we had to try making Pavochon ourselves, the real Puerto Rican way. This year, it happened that Thanksgiving was only going to be 4 of us — Rachel’s parents and the two of us, so we were assigned to doing the cooking. So if we were in charge, why not mix it up and do it Puerto Rican style?

Click on the “Read the rest of this entry” link below for more.

Daisy has a really good recipe for Pavochon which I reccomend highly — but in Guavate, I saw this particular turkey:

Guavate, Puerto Rico by you.

It had been deboned and stuffed back into its own skin and then roasted. This got me thinking — what if we took Daisy’s recipe, de-boned it, and then smoked it on my Weber Bullet, so it would really taste like slow roasted turkey over charcoal? Then it would be BARBECUE! And Puerto Rican at the same time!

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

First, you got your turkey. This is a regular supermarket turkey in the 12-14 pound range, which we bought frozen and then thawed out. As you can see, we completely removed all the skin from the breast area, and then laid it on a separate baking sheet, like so:

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

We then seasoned this with Adobo Seasoning Mix, cumin, and fresh ground black pepper.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

We then removed the legs and wings from the turkey. Keep the wings aside and roast them separately, they are a great treat to keep for yourself as a snack later on when everyone goes home.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

And removed the breast meat, leaving just an empty carcass. You can now throw him in a stock pot and make soup.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

After removing the legs and the breasts, cut all the dark meat off the legs and throw the bones into the stock pot with the carcass.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

Layer the dark meat onto the Turkey skin, and hit it with some more Adobo seasoning and cumin and black pepper.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

In a food processor, make 1 recipe of Daisy’s Wet Adobo.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

Spread the Wet Adobo on the dark meat.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

Now layer on the breast meat and do the same. You might need to slice up the breasts so they lay more flat and even.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

Now, using butcher’s twine, truss up the turkey like a Pork Roast. Here’s a video of how to do this. If a bit of the dark meat comes out the skin, its not a big deal.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

Here’s a close-up of the knotting process.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

This is how it should look when you are done. The roast is now sitting on top of a roasting rack in a disposable aluminum double roasting pan. Put some more Adobo seasoning and salt and pepper and cumin on the top for good measure, cover this with plastic wrap and let him sit in the fridge to marinate for 2 days.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

When its time to cook the roast, put your root vegetables (Onion, Carrots) in the bottom of the aluminum pan. I used a Weber Bullet to smoke the roast over charcoals and hickory at approximately 225 degrees for 3 1/2 hours, or until the internal temperature of the meat was around 155 degrees, which is par-cooked, because i was going to transport it to my in-laws and re-heat it in the oven at 325 for about a half an hour. If you are going to fully cook the turkey in your backyard grill, it should probably take about 4 to 4 and a half hours, or until the temperature of the meat with a probe reaches 165 degrees.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

Here’s a little bit of dark meat we grabbed off the roast. That pink color comes from the smoke.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

Here’s the pan juices. We thew the whole lot into a blender with some additional stock (remember that carcass you cooked?) and made it into gravy.

Pavochon Ahumado Puertorriqueño by you.

Here’s the Pavochon, just out of the BBQ Smoker.

Thanksgiving 2008 by you.

Here’s the table at my in-laws, set and ready to go.

Thanksgiving 2008 by you.

Here’s the Pavochon after being re-heated in the oven.

Thanksgiving 2008 by you.

Smoked Turkey wing, for mom.

Thanksgiving 2008 by you.

Here’s the Pavochon sliced up, in all of its glory.

Thanksgiving 2008 by you.

What do you serve Pavochon with? Well, we wanted to amp up the vegetable content with this meal, so we decided to whip up some “Boriqua Slaw”. This is not a traditional Puerto Rican dish, but its great for a salad course and is a great use for Daisy’s Pinapple Vinagre.

Thanksgiving 2008 by you.

No traditional Puerto Rican meal is complete without Arroz con Gandules. Our version used brown rice, and we also added Calabaza, Puerto Rican Pumpkin. Calabaza is a term for different types of pumpkin that is commonly found in the Caribbean but you can get it in certain Latino supermarkets in major cities. This is what it looks like:

Plaza Del Mercado en Santurce, San Juan PR by you.

Here is a variety of Calabaza that is sold in Puerto Rico. You can find other varieties with different flesh colorations. Some of the ones that come from other countries have very bright orange flesh. Some of these are so big that they have to sell it in peices wrapped in plastic wrap.

Thanksgiving 2008 by you.

Here’s the soup, a Caldo Gallego, which is a traditional soup from Galicia in Spain similar to an Escarole and Bean soup. This was made with the Turkey Stock from the deboned turkey, beans, cubed Calabaza, Chicken Andouille sausage (traditionally it calls for Chorizo) and lots of Kale.

Thanksgiving 2008 by you.

Heres a plate of Asparagus and Green Beans sauteed with Garlic. Gotta have your veggies!

Thanksgiving 2008 by you.

For dessert, Pumpkin Flan made with Calabaza. This was based off of Ellie Krieger’s recipe from Food Network. Pretty much exactly the same as her recipe, but we used leftover cooked and strained Calabaza instead of canned pumpkin.

Thanksgiving 2008 by you.

And for dessert #2, Rachel’s Mom’s Apple Crumble.

Thanksgiving 2008 by you.

Buen Provecho and Happy Holidays!

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

5 Responses to A Jewish Puerto Rican Thanksgiving

  1. […] iconic American centerpiece of Thanksgiving, has also been integrated into Puerto Rican culture as Pavochon, which was created by New York Puerto Rican immigrants (“Newyoriquens“) about 50 years […]

  2. […] Related: A Jewish Puerto Rican Thanksgiving […]

  3. Good lord, man! That Pavochon is a thing of beauty and might possibly cause me to reconsider my anti-turkey stance.

    Happy Thanksgiving, and thank you for all of the great restaurant reviews throughout the year. You’ve introduced us to some fabulous, new (to us) places.

  4. […] Cubano made with Toufayan Low-Carb Sandwich Wrap, leftover Pavochon, Pickles, Low-Fat Swiss Cheese, and Hot Vinegar Peppers with a side of Boriqua Slaw. Click on the […]

  5. […] it! I did something like that for Thanksgiving with turkey. If interested here is a recipe http://offthebroiler.wordpress.com/2…-thanksgiving/ Good job on dead lift! Age: 24 Weight: 137.8 lbs Height: 5"8" Body fat: 22.8% […]

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 220 other followers

%d bloggers like this: